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Tyler Grisham Jersey Store

The impending departures of Jeff Scott and his father, Brad, to South Florida obviously will result in some reassignments.

Tony Elliott, who had shared offensive coordinator duties with Scott for the past five seasons, will be the sole offensive coordinator, Coach Dabo Swinney said Friday.

Brandon Streeter is expected to remain quarterbacks coach, but also assume the title of passing game coordinator. He’ll likely relinquish his recruiting coordinator title to someone else on staff.

Tyler Grisham, who has served as offensive analyst, will replace Jeff Scott as wide receivers coach. He got his first taste of his new duties on Friday.

Clemson wide receiver coach Tyler Grisham communicates with players during practice at the Poe Indoor Facility in Clemson Friday, December 13, 2019. The Tigers are preparing for the College Football Playoffs semi-final game with Ohio State University played in Glendale, Arizona on December 28, 2019. Buy Photo
Clemson wide receiver coach Tyler Grisham communicates with players during practice at the Poe Indoor Facility in Clemson Friday, December 13, 2019. The Tigers are preparing for the College Football Playoffs semi-final game with Ohio State University played in Glendale, Arizona on December 28, 2019. (Photo: Ken Ruinard / staff)

“It was good to see Grish have his first day out there with a whistle,” Swinney said of Grisham, who was a receiver at Clemson from 2005 to 2008. “He’s never had a whistle in practice since he’s been here.

“We have a good plan for all that stuff and have a great group of people here. We’re excited about getting it all settled out.”

The Scotts’ return
Jeff and Brad will return to Clemson after signing day next week and will remain in their capacities with the program through season’s end.

“Hopefully it’s January 14th,” Swinney said. “Jeff will be back here on Thursday and he’ll be orange and purple with Clemson all the way through. He’s excited about that. We all want to finish the right way. Jeff’s passionate about Clemson and his players and the relationships here and so is Brad. So it’ll be a lot of fun to be able to finish out with those guys.”

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Brad has served as the program’s director of player development and recruiting transition; he’s expected to be replaced by Kyle Richardson, who is Swinney’s senior offensive assistant.

“Kyle Richardson has done an awesome job stepping in for Brad there to fill that role and help us navigate,” Swinney said. “Brad’s role is critical. He does a lot of stuff here, especially in the recruiting process, and Kyle has a great feel for all of that.”

And what about Galloway?
Swinney still hasn’t received official word that tight end Braden Galloway has been cleared to return to the Tigers’ lineup, but is proceeding as if he will be.

Galloway was one of three players suspended for a year, beginning with last season’s College Football Playoff, after testing positive for the banned substance ostarine.

Clemson tight end Braden Galloway (88) runs after a catch during practice at the Allen N. Reeves Football Complex Monday, August 5, 2019.Buy Photo
Clemson tight end Braden Galloway (88) runs after a catch during practice at the Allen N. Reeves Football Complex Monday, August 5, 2019. (Photo: Ken Ruinard / staff)

“I’m assuming that he’s gonna be good to go,” Swinney said. “My hope is he’ll be ready to go. We’re going to practice as if he is. Hopefully we’ll know here in another day or so.”

Galloway played in 12 games as a freshman in 2018, catching five passes for 52 yards and a touchdown.

“The intensity is at a different level, but it’s not like he hasn’t been playing football all year,” Swinney said. “He’s been practicing every day. He’s in great shape. He’s caught a million balls.”

Mickey Slaughter Jersey Store

ALAMEDA, Calif. — Hall of Fame cornerback Willie Brown, regarded as the godfather of bump-and-run coverage, died Tuesdayat the age of 78 after a lengthy battle with cancer.

Brown had been one of the closest confidantes of late Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis, as well as a trusted adviser to Mark Davis, who took control of the team upon his father’s death in October 2011.

“He,” Mark Davis wrote of Brown in a text, “was a Raider.”

Undrafted out of Grambling State in 1963, Brown initially signed with the Houston Oilers before being cut and then signed by the Denver Broncos. He came to the Raiders, along with quarterback Mickey Slaughter, in a trade for defensive tackle Rex Mirich and a third-round draft pick in 1967.

Brown had already been perfecting his version of bump-and-run coverage.

“I didn’t know anything about backpedaling and running with the receivers,” Brown said in 2013. “But if I got my hands on him, the receiver can’t get open.”

Al Davis, after returning to Oakland following his stint as AFL commissioner, based his bump-and-run coverage on John Wooden’s defensive principles when his UCLA men’s basketball team was in a full-court press. The 6-foot-1, 195-pound Brown was big for a cornerback at that time, and his physicality complemented fellow cornerback Kent McCloughan.

“That reflects back on the staff and the players, and Al Davis was the backbone of it all,” Brown said. “The opportunity he gave me when he traded for me, he gave me free reign. I’m in 10 halls of fame and it started with an opportunity.”

Brown had 15 interceptions in four seasons with the Broncos. In 12 seasons with the Raiders, he added 39 more, tied for most in franchise history with Lester Hayes, who would refer to Brown as his personal “Yoda.”

“We are deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Raiders’ great Willie Brown,” NFL commissioner Roger Goodell said in a statement Tuesday. “As a player, coach, and executive, Willie served as a tremendous ambassador for the Raiders and football for more than 50 years. He will forever be immortalized by NFL Films with his iconic 75-yard interception return in Super Bowl XI as he ran straight into the camera and our imaginations.

“After a remarkable 16-year Pro Football Hall of Fame career that he began as an undrafted free agent, Willie went on to become a Raiders coach and later a member of the team’s front office. Willie lived the Raiders’ motto ‘Commitment to Excellence’ with integrity and touched the lives of hundreds of NFL players with his wisdom and wit. Willie was always a welcome guest at the NFL draft, and I enjoyed visiting with him each year. He was always enthusiastic and optimistic about the Raiders’ picks and upcoming season.”

As a player, Brown was approached by 10 defensive coordinators who wanted him to teach them the intricacies of bump-and-run.

Davis was incensed.

“Hell no, you can’t teach those guys,” Davis told Brown, who howled with laughter at the memory.

“I didn’t play DB in college,” Brown said. “I just knew that if you beat the hell out of the receivers coming off the line of scrimmage, that was going to affect whether they could catch the ball or not.”

The first quarterback Brown intercepted in his professional career was the Raiders’ Tom Flores, on Dec. 15, 1963, when Brown was 23 years old. The last QB he got was the New England Patriots’ Steve Grogan on Sept. 24, 1978, when Brown was almost 38.

His favorite quarterback? Brown said it was fellow Hall of Famer Fran Tarkenton, whom he victimized for a 75-yard pick-six in the fourth quarter of the Raiders’ 32-14 defeat of the Minnesota Vikings in Super Bowl XI, the “Old Man Willie” play immortalized by radio broadcaster Bill King.

“They were in that hurry-up offense, so I knew he was going to throw the ball to Sammy White,” Brown said. “I’m a gambler, and I wasn’t even supposed to be there. I told Ted [Hendricks] to stay inside and I told Jack [Tatum] to stay deep. And that’s where he threw the ball.

“All I’m thinking is, I’ve got to score. I knew nobody could catch me because there wasn’t nobody else out there. We’ve got the game in hand, just don’t get caught.”

The leader of Oakland’s “Soul Patrol” secondary, which included “Assassin” Tatum, George “Hit Man” Atkinson and “Dr. Death” Skip Thomas, Brown joined the Raiders’ coaching staff as a defensive backs coach after retiring following the 1978 season. He later was head coach at Long Beach State in 1991.

“Coach Brown was a solid man,” said Gerard Brooks, who played defensive tackle for Brown at Long Beach. “Also an inspirational guy. When he was with us, he was coaching full-time while working on his master’s, but still made time for you. … He had a huge impact on my direction. Blessed to have been around him.”

Brown, who was enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1984, returned to the Raiders in an administrative role when the team returned to Oakland from Los Angeles in 1995, and he also served as an assistant before becoming the team ambassador — a position in which he served until his death.

He was also known for his tradition of wishing a happy Mother’s Day to all the moms when announcing the Raiders’ second-round pick at the NFL draft.

Brown is the second iconic Raiders figure and longtime Davis family friend to die since training camp opened. Wide receiver Cliff Branch died Aug. 3,two days after his 71st birthday.

Terrell Watson Jersey Store

NEWPORT — A woman is set to plead guilty to a criminal charge that she tried to get a Claremont shooting victim to change his story, according to a new court filing.

Kayla Marsh, 27, of Newport, is set to plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit witness tampering, alleging that she tried to get the shooting victim, Edward Boisvert, 37, to change his story about the shooting, according to a notice of intent to plead guilty recently filed in the Sullivan Superior Court.

Marsh’s attorney, Rebecca McKinnon, signed the notice which indicates Marsh is seeking a capped plea of no more than a 9-month jail sentence with three years probation and no contact with Boisvert.

Terrell Watson, 34, Marsh’s then-boyfriend, pleaded guilty earlier this year to charges of first-degree assault, conspiracy to commit first-degree assault, and being a felon in possession of a firearm related to the shooting of Boisvert over a reported romantic conflict.

According to an affidavit filed in court by Claremont Police Detective Casey Piehl, Watson and Marsh talked to each other on the night of Feb. 28 about getting Boisvert to say he didn’t know who shot him on Oct. 2, 2018, in a High Street apartment in Claremont.

At one point, Marsh had two phone calls going, talking to both Watson and Boisvert on separate phones, according to Piehl’s affidavit. Sullivan County House of Correction staff record prisoner phone calls and provided recording to Claremont police, according to court records.

During one of the calls, Marsh got Boisvert to agree to provide a written statement to the investigator working for Watson’s attorney that he, Boisvert, does not know who shot him.

“MARSH — Well, he has it on paper right now.

WATSON — That’s not enough, I need him to say he knows it wasn’t.

MARSH — Yeah, well he’s not in trouble. All he needs to do is say to the investigator that, on paper, he doesn’t know who it is.”

Watson was sentenced to up to 15 years in the case.

Sullivan County Attorney Marc Hathaway said in court in February that Boisvert sustained a grave injury when he was shot by Watson with a Ruger pistol. Though he has recovered, Boisvert was in serious medical danger when he walked himself to the Golden Cross Ambulance headquarters off North Street in Claremont following the shooting.

Hathaway said the shooting came out of a conflict over romantic relationships.

Watson was arrested the day after the shooting following a massive police response in the region, including Claremont, Charlestown, and Newport police, as well as New Hampshire State Police troopers and the Sullivan County Sheriff’s Department.

Jerome Couplin Jersey Store

Allen Park — It’s been four years since the Detroit Lions released wide receiver Ryan Broyles, and he hasn’t appeared in a professional football game since he was cut. But that might be changing in the near future. The former second-round pick out of Oklahoma has been listed as part of the XFL’s draft pool.

Broyles was one of several players featured on the startup league’s announcement. The draft, which will be conducted Oct. 15-16, will help establish 71-man rosters for each of the eight teams.

One of the most productive receivers in college football history, the Lions selected Broyles with the No. 54 pick in the 2012 draft. After suffering an ACL tear to end his college career, he continued to battle significant injuries during his short time with the Lions, including tearing his other ACL and rupturing his Achilles tendon.

More: Ex-MSU star Connor Cook gets into the ring with XFL, enters upcoming draft

In total, he appeared in 21 games over three seasons, catching 32 passes for 420 yards and two touchdowns.

Among the other former Lions players to enter the XFL draft pool are defensive end Devin Taylor, cornerback Mohammed Seisey and safety-turned-linebacker Jerome Couplin.

Steve Alvord Jersey Store

Nearly 30 years since he last officially pulled on the purple for the University of Washington, former defensive tackle Steve Alvord said he and a group of four or five former teammates still gather for most Huskies home games to tailgate and enjoy the games.

Once a year, they try to “chase the Dawgs” and make a road game – often crashing at a friend’s house in Los Angeles when UW plays at USC or UCLA.

“We talk more about what’s going on in our lives now,” said Alvord, who serves as a vice president financial adviser at asset and wealth management firm D.A. Davidson in Bellingham. “We’ve each gone on and built our own lives, and it’s fun talking about our kids and our families. But we always have those memories of playing together, too. We spent four years together, and we have that common thread.”

That thread will now forever tie Alvord and his teammates to UW immortality in the Husky Hall of Fame.

The 1984 Washington football team – winners of the 1985 Orange Bowl – will be one of eight inductees into the Hall at a ceremony Sunday, Oct. 23, at Alaska Airlines Arena. The team will join fellow Class of 2016 members Olin Kreutz (football, 1995-97), Sara Pickering (softball, 1994-97), Nate Robinson (basketball, 2003-05; football 2002), Bob Rondeau (radio announcer, 1978-present), Sanja Tomasevic (volleyball, 2002-05), Brad Walker (track and field, 2002-05) and Mary Whipple (rowing, 1999-2002).

Alvord, who graduated from Bellingham High in 1983, said at least 50 members of the ’84 squad have responded to an email string and are planning to travel to attend the festivities, which Alvord said was expected to include a Friday night gathering at a former teammate’s house near the University District in Seattle and a return to Husky Stadium to be honored at halftime of UW’s game against Oregon State on Saturday, Oct. 22. The weekend, of course, will be capped by the induction ceremony.

“I’ll probably know more about what it feels like after the event,” Alvord said. “It’s kind of surreal now. I have a couple of buddies that are in the Hall of Fame, but it really hasn’t hit me what it means, yet.

Dick Evans Jersey Store

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) — This week’s vintage “On The Michigan Road” story takes you to Marshall to meet a unique ice chamber.

This report originally aired on Jan. 10, 1989. Dick Evans visited a farmer who lived in Marshall. He turned the farmer’s silo into an ice cliff by putting water around it so that he could climb it.

=== Watch the May 1989 report above. ===

Between 1971 and 1991, Evans filed his popular “On The Michigan Road” reports from all over the state. They featured everything from county fairs to people with offbeat hobbies and collections to some of Michigan’s most iconic locations. He died in October 1991 at the age of 66 after more than 40 years in broadcasting.

You won’t want to miss next week’s specials as we will be airing a report on both Thursday and Friday at 7 p.m.

Doc Parkinson Jersey Store

Well known and loved Doc Parkinson, owner of Maglebys Restaurant for 35 years, passed away in his sleep in the early morning of August 6th. Doc had stayed active until complications from a fractured hip got the better of him. He is survived by his wife Lenora, 5 children, 31 grand children and 34 great grand children.

Doc was raised in Bethesda, Maryland. His father, Edmund West Parkinson, was a federal judge in Washington, DC. His mother, Ina Creer Parkinson, was a popular school teacher. Doc had one older brother, Roger Parkinson, who died in a plane crash when he was in his mid thirties.

Doc was an all around athlete in high school earning 9 varsity letters. He later took up golf and became a scratch player. Doc served a mission on the French Riviera between 1949 and 1952. While a student photographer at BYU he met Lenora Hoyal, a BYU cheerleader. They quickly fell in love and were soon married in Salt Lake City Temple. Their love continued for the next 61 years. Doc and Lenora were called to the Bristol England Mission and served from April 1996 to October 1997. Doc attended BYU and graduated from Georgetown Dental School. He had a private dental practice in Bethesda, Maryland until at the age of 49 when he sold his practice and switched careers. In 1981 Doc and his best friend, Hal Magleby, opened Magleby’s Restaurant in Provo, Utah. The restaurant’s popularity continues to this day. The restaurant has won numerous awards and is famous for it’s Best in State chocolate cake. Doc is perhaps best known for greeting his patrons at the door and handing out free bread sticks or truffles. In 2004 he received the Reed Smoot Businessman of the Year Award.

No conversation about Doc would be complete without mentioning his love for motorcycles and the outdoors. He was honored by the Honda Corporation when he reached 200,000 miles on his CX500 Custom Honda motorcycle. Most of all Doc loved life. His greatest passion was to share and freely give of himself so others could learn and enjoy the same things he did. He leaves behind 3 generations that now play golf, ride motorcycles and ski the “bird.” He also shared with us his testimony of the gospel of Jesus Christ, which was the foundation of his life. “Doc” you are in our hearts and minds forever.

Services will be held on Saturday, August 16th, 2014 at the LDS Chapel on 3050 Mohave Lane in Provo. Visiting will begin at 10:00am and the funeral service will follow at 11:00am. Donations should be made to the LDS Missionary Fund and condolences may be sent to the family

Ron Fellows Jersey Store

All Tommy Joe Martins wants for Christmas is to share the big news: Martins Motorsports is back. On Tuesday, he announced the family-operated team would return to NASCAR competition, running the #44 Chevrolet Camaro full-time in the Xfinity Series.

“I’m extremely nervous but also very excited about this journey we’re going on with Martins Motorsports,” Martins tweeted. “Wouldn’t be possible without the huge commitments from my father & our new co-owner Rodney Riessen. They’re all in to make this year successful. Also thanks to Diamond Gusset who’s always been behind me through my NASCAR career.

“We’ll be running our old 44 number, operating out of a shop in Mooresville, racing under the Chevrolet banner. As a GM employee & instructor at Ron Fellows school, it’s really neat to be back as a Chevy team & driver.”

The team began racing in what is now the NASCAR Gander RV & Outdoors Truck Series in 2009. After sporadic starts in the series that year and in 2011, Martins Motorsports moved up to the Xfinity Series in 2014, running eleven races with a best finish of fourteenth at Talladega Superspeedway.

After a year-long dormancy, the organisation returned to the Trucks in 2016 on a full-time basis, where Martins ran all but two races in the #44. Martins finished the year twenty-third in points with a best run of fifteenth at Michigan International Speedway. The team’s last starts took place in 2017 with three Truck races, with their latest finish being thirty-second at Texas Motor Speedway.

Martins Motorsports closed at the end of the season due to financial difficulties, and Martins eventually joined B.J. McLeod Motorsports and MBM Motorsports during the 2018 and 2019 Xfinity seasons. In fifty-seven career Xfinity starts, Martins has ten top-twenty finishes, including a best placing of eleventh at Iowa Speedway with BJMM in 2017.

Although Martins intends to run as many races as he can, he has clarified he is not a full-time driver for the team.

“I want to be a part time driver for this team,” he explained. “This is an open seat. It’s my job to be a good driver for us through the early part of the season, get this car in the points & prove that we can be a successful Xfinity Series team.

“We’re still in the early stages of this. We’ve already hired a few people full time & received a few sponsor commitments but we need more sponsors, more personnel (spotter, hauler driver, mechanic, car chief, social media manager) & more of your support to make it work.”

Martins Motorsports is the second new full-time team confirmed for the 2020 Xfinity season. In October, Our Motorsports announced it would field the #02 for Andy Seuss in a full campaign.

Nick Buoniconti Jersey Store

Nick Buoniconti, a tenacious middle linebacker who won two Super Bowls in the 1970s with the Miami Dolphins and in retirement turned his doggedness to finding a cure for his son’s paralysis, died on Tuesday at his home in Bridgehampton, N.Y. He was 78.

The son, Marc Buoniconti, the president of the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, which his father helped found, announced the death. His said his father had been in hospice care.

In 2015 doctors told Nick Buoniconti that he showed symptoms of dementia. Two years later he agreed to donate his brain to researchers at Boston University. They are to determine if his repeated head injuries as a player caused chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease.

As of 2017, the university’s C.T.E. Center had found the disease in 110 of the 111 former N.F.L. players’ brains it had examined.

“I’m positive that football caused this,” Buoniconti said in “The Many Lives of Nick Buoniconti” (2019), an HBO documentary. In an interview for the film, he showed his frustration with the halting speech that his dementia had caused.

“I’m not mad at the game, I’m mad at the owners,” he said. “I think that we paved the way for the N.F.L. being what it is today. In other words, we, uh, we paved the way for them and they’re, they’re reaping all the benefits.”

He added, “Sorry, I’m not, uh, I’m not, uh, coherent.”

For many years Buoniconti was an intelligent, articulate and tough player for the Boston Patriots (now the New England Patriots) and the Dolphins, winning All-Pro honors five times in a 14-year pro football career. A former All-American at the University of Notre Dame, he anchored the Dolphins’ vaunted “No-Name Defense” under Coach Don Shula.

Afterward he became a lawyer, a player agent, a TV sports personality, a corporate executive and the lead voice of the Miami Project.

Marc Buoniconti severely injured his spinal cord in a college football game in 1985. For more than 30 years afterward, Buoniconti helped raise nearly $500 million for spinal cord and brain research carried out by the organization. He also played a critical role in directing the research and was a charismatic motivator of scientists and researchers.

Dr. Barth Green, a neurosurgeon and longtime chairman of the Miami Project, said in a phone interview: “People are walking now because of cellular transplants and the latest neuroengineering and bioengineering that has been applied to humans with disability. Nick was a stimulating force in that area, from bench to bedside. And this is someone who probably never took a science course.”

Nicholas Anthony Buoniconti Jr. was born on Dec. 15, 1940, in Springfield, Mass., to Nicholas Sr. and Pasqualina (Mercolino) Buoniconti. They ran an Italian bakery, Mercolino’s, in Springfield’s South End. If not for his athletic skills, Buoniconti said, he might have spent the rest of his life working at the bakery, making fresh bread every morning as his father and grandfather had.

“He had three things going for him,” his brother Peter said in the HBO documentary. “He was the best athlete in the South End, he was one of the smartest kids in the South End, and he was the toughest kid in the South End. So he was just a special kid.”

Nick excelled as an undersized linebacker at Notre Dame. But his coach, Joe Kuharich, did not recommend him to National Football League scouts; Kuharich felt that at 5-foot-11 and 210 pounds, Buoniconti was too small for the N.F.L. Kuharich told him to set his sights on the American Football League, which had started in 1960 as an audacious challenge to the older N.F.L.

Buoniconti did, and was drafted by the Patriots in the 13th round of the 1962 A.F.L. draft. The N.F.L. did not draft him at all.

As a Patriot, he was an All-Pro four times and led the team in tackles and interceptions in his seven seasons with Boston. He distinguished himself off the field by studying at the Suffolk University School of Law in Boston to prepare for his post-playing career, graduating in 1968.

“Once I got my law degree, I was determined not to let football rule me,” he said in the HBO documentary.

He was traded to the Dolphins in 1969 and contemplated retiring. But he agreed to a long-term deal with the team, joining a young roster. Miami went 3-10-1 in his first season, but the team’s fortunes changed the next year, when Shula guided it to a 10-4 record.

It was the start of a memorable run of success for the Dolphins. After the A.F.L.-N.F.L. merger, they were American Football Conference champions in 1971, though they lost to the Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowl VI. And in 1972 they went undefeated, capping what became a 17-0 season with a 14-7 victory over the Washington Redskins in Super Bowl VII in January 1973. No team since then has gone undefeated for an entire season (though the Patriots came close in 2008, when their 18-0 run ended with a Super Bowl loss to the Giants.)

Buoniconti became the only member of Miami’s No-Name Defense to be elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

“We were embarrassed by how we played against the Cowboys,” Buoniconti told The New York Times in 2012. “The fact that we were undefeated was accidental. It happened. We also had skills and luck and great coaching. It was more chemistry than ability.”

The Dolphins won the next Super Bowl as well, beating the Minnesota Vikings, 24-7.

Buoniconti finished playing after the 1976 season, pleased to have retired with his health.

“My last game, I got on my hands and knees and kissed the ground and thanked God that I’d never gotten seriously hurt,” he said in an interview with Sports Illustrated in 2017. He estimated that he had absorbed 520,000 hits to his head.

He used his law degree for several years in private practice, where his work included representing athletes, among them the baseball player Andre Dawson, then of the Montreal Expos, in contract negotiations. In 1979, he started a 23-year run as a host of the HBO Sports series “Inside the NFL,” teaming up with Len Dawson, the former quarterback of the Kansas City Chiefs.

And in 1983, he joined United States Tobacco as a senior vice president, earning 10 times the salary he had received in his best years in the N.F.L.

Buoniconti famously defended the company’s smokeless tobacco products as safe. In a segment of “60 Minutes” in 1986, he told the correspondent Ed Bradley that there had been no scientific proof that smokeless tobacco had caused oral cancer, though Mr. Bradley pointed to studies that had done just that. Despite the shaky performance — which he later regretted — he was soon promoted to president of the company.

But by then, Marc Buoniconti had been critically injured while playing linebacker for The Citadel, the military college in Charleston, S.C., during a game against East Tennessee State in Johnson City, Tenn., in October 1985. He was left paralyzed from the neck down.

Nick Buoniconti eventually left U.S. Tobacco, saying he could no longer devote himself full-time to the company while focusing on his son’s treatments in Miami.

Buoniconti’s devotion to the Miami Project — organizing fund-raising events like sports legends dinners, cajoling researchers to find therapies and getting involved in grant applications — became his focus. When he was inducted into the Hall of Fame, in Canton, Ohio, he reminded the audience that he was wearing the Super Bowl ring that commemorated the Dolphins’ undefeated season.

“I would trade this ring in and all my individual accomplishments if one thing could happen in my lifetime,” he said. “My son Marc dreams that he walks, and as a father I would like nothing more than to be by his side.”

In addition to Marc, Mr. Buoniconti is survived by his wife, Lynn (Weiss) Buoniconti; his daughter, Gina Buoniconti; another son, Nicholas III; a stepson, Justin Weiss; four grandchildren; and his brothers Robert and Peter. His marriage to Terry Salamano ended in divorce.

Buoniconti began showing signs of dementia in 2013. He had trouble with his memory and balance. He fell frequently. Two years later he showed symptoms suggesting dementia, Alzheimer’s disease and C.T.E. Further testing pointed increasingly to the likelihood of C.T.E., which is characterized by elevated amounts of a protein, tau, that slowly kills brain cells. C.T.E. can be definitively diagnosed only in an autopsy.

In Buoniconti’s final years, Marc provided the sort of emotional support that his father had given him after his catastrophic injury.

”Well, I should’ve been dead years ago,” he said in the HBO documentary. “It’s only because of my father that I’m here today. It’s only because of my father that I”m able to live the life that I do.”

Micah Kiser Jersey Store

RICHMOND, Va. (WSET) – For the second year in a row, UVa’s Bryce Perkins has won the Dudley Award, recognizing the state’s top Division One player.

Perkins is the first repeat winner from UVa and joins JMU’s Vad Lee as the second-ever back-to-back winner.

Virginia Tech’s Lee Suggs was a repeat winner, but earned the honor in 2000 and 2002.

This year’s two other finalists were Tech’s Rayshard Ashby and JMU defensive lineman Ron’Dell Carter.

With Perkins winning again this year, UVa has won the Dudley three years in a row for the first time.

Micah Kiser began the streak in 2017.

When the Redhawks scored 34 unanswered points in a 34-12 win over Framingham 366 days later, Felix Ferrucci’s pearly whites were on full display for pictures and a town-wide celebration at Memorial Field.

NATICK — Around 1 p.m. on Thursday, Felix Ferrucci had a grin on his face.

It went from ear to ear.

The Natick High football senior captain waited for over a year to smile that big.

Last year, on the day before Thanksgiving, Ferrucci wasn’t grinning as his team fell to rival Framingham at Fenway Park. Ferrucci’s older brother, Max, was a senior captain for Natick.

PHOTOS: Hopkinton beats Super-Bowl bound Ashland on Turkey Day
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6/6HIDE CAPTION Hopkinton’s Drew Saporoschetz runs the ball for a first down during the Hillers’ Thanksgiving Day win over Ashland at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
1/6HIDE CAPTION Hopkinton’s Cole Salyards (right) looks for a hole in the defense during a Thanksgiving Day football game against Ashland at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. The Hillers won, 26-7. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
2/6HIDE CAPTION Ashland’s Eddie Lopez gets the touchdown during a Thanksgiving Day football game against Hopkinton at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. The Hillers won, however, 26-7. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
3/6HIDE CAPTION Hopkinton’s Cam Mulvaney (center) runs the ball during a Thanksgiving Day football game against Ashland at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
4/6HIDE CAPTION Ashland’s Brandon Grover (left) runs the ball during the Clockers’ Thanksgiving Day football game against Hopkinton at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
5/6HIDE CAPTION Ashland’s Dominic Cavanagh passes the ball during a Thanksgiving Day football game against Hopkinton at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
6/6HIDE CAPTION Hopkinton’s Drew Saporoschetz runs the ball for a first down during the Hillers’ Thanksgiving Day win over Ashland at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
1/6HIDE CAPTION Hopkinton’s Cole Salyards (right) looks for a hole in the defense during a Thanksgiving Day football game against Ashland at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. The Hillers won, 26-7. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
2/6HIDE CAPTION Ashland’s Eddie Lopez gets the touchdown during a Thanksgiving Day football game against Hopkinton at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. The Hillers won, however, 26-7. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
3/6HIDE CAPTION Hopkinton’s Cam Mulvaney (center) runs the ball during a Thanksgiving Day football game against Ashland at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
4/6HIDE CAPTION Ashland’s Brandon Grover (left) runs the ball during the Clockers’ Thanksgiving Day football game against Hopkinton at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
5/6HIDE CAPTION Ashland’s Dominic Cavanagh passes the ball during a Thanksgiving Day football game against Hopkinton at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
6/6HIDE CAPTION Hopkinton’s Drew Saporoschetz runs the ball for a first down during the Hillers’ Thanksgiving Day win over Ashland at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
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When the Redhawks scored 34 unanswered points in a 34-12 win over Framingham 366 days later, Ferrucci’s pearly whites were on full display for pictures and a town-wide celebration at Memorial Field.

“Last year we couldn’t get it done. We were thinking about that Fenway night for (over a year) and today we came in and just pounded the ball and came out on top,” Ferrucci said. “It’s the best feeling I’ve had in awhile.”

Natick (10-1) improved its overall edge in the Turkey Day series to 76-33-5 over Framingham (4-7) and brings the coveted Elks trophy back home.When the Redhawks scored 34 unanswered points in a 34-12 win over Framingham 366 days later, Felix Ferrucci’s pearly whites were on full display for pictures and a town-wide celebration at Memorial Field.

NATICK — Around 1 p.m. on Thursday, Felix Ferrucci had a grin on his face.

It went from ear to ear.

The Natick High football senior captain waited for over a year to smile that big.

Last year, on the day before Thanksgiving, Ferrucci wasn’t grinning as his team fell to rival Framingham at Fenway Park. Ferrucci’s older brother, Max, was a senior captain for Natick.

PHOTOS: Hopkinton beats Super-Bowl bound Ashland on Turkey Day
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6/6HIDE CAPTION Hopkinton’s Drew Saporoschetz runs the ball for a first down during the Hillers’ Thanksgiving Day win over Ashland at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
1/6HIDE CAPTION Hopkinton’s Cole Salyards (right) looks for a hole in the defense during a Thanksgiving Day football game against Ashland at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. The Hillers won, 26-7. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
2/6HIDE CAPTION Ashland’s Eddie Lopez gets the touchdown during a Thanksgiving Day football game against Hopkinton at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. The Hillers won, however, 26-7. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
3/6HIDE CAPTION Hopkinton’s Cam Mulvaney (center) runs the ball during a Thanksgiving Day football game against Ashland at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
4/6HIDE CAPTION Ashland’s Brandon Grover (left) runs the ball during the Clockers’ Thanksgiving Day football game against Hopkinton at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
5/6HIDE CAPTION Ashland’s Dominic Cavanagh passes the ball during a Thanksgiving Day football game against Hopkinton at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
6/6HIDE CAPTION Hopkinton’s Drew Saporoschetz runs the ball for a first down during the Hillers’ Thanksgiving Day win over Ashland at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
1/6HIDE CAPTION Hopkinton’s Cole Salyards (right) looks for a hole in the defense during a Thanksgiving Day football game against Ashland at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. The Hillers won, 26-7. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
2/6HIDE CAPTION Ashland’s Eddie Lopez gets the touchdown during a Thanksgiving Day football game against Hopkinton at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. The Hillers won, however, 26-7. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
3/6HIDE CAPTION Hopkinton’s Cam Mulvaney (center) runs the ball during a Thanksgiving Day football game against Ashland at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
4/6HIDE CAPTION Ashland’s Brandon Grover (left) runs the ball during the Clockers’ Thanksgiving Day football game against Hopkinton at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
5/6HIDE CAPTION Ashland’s Dominic Cavanagh passes the ball during a Thanksgiving Day football game against Hopkinton at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
6/6HIDE CAPTION Hopkinton’s Drew Saporoschetz runs the ball for a first down during the Hillers’ Thanksgiving Day win over Ashland at Hopkinton High School on Thursday. [Daily News and Wicked Local Photo/Dan Holmes]
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When the Redhawks scored 34 unanswered points in a 34-12 win over Framingham 366 days later, Ferrucci’s pearly whites were on full display for pictures and a town-wide celebration at Memorial Field.

“Last year we couldn’t get it done. We were thinking about that Fenway night for (over a year) and today we came in and just pounded the ball and came out on top,” Ferrucci said. “It’s the best feeling I’ve had in awhile.”

Natick (10-1) improved its overall edge in the Turkey Day series to 76-33-5 over Framingham (4-7) and brings the coveted Elks trophy back home.